South Korea Work Visa Requirements & Application

South Korea has several international agreements for a more straightforward visa process for citizens of some countries.

This can mean you can apply for a work visa in South Korea even if you’re not from South Korea.

This article will explain how to get a work visa to South Korea and what documents are needed when applying (and what documents aren’t required).

South Korea has several international agreements for a more straightforward visa process for citizens of some countries.

When you apply for a South Korea work visa, you will need to meet the following requirements:

  • You must be eligible to enter the country. This means that your passport must be valid, and there are no outstanding fines or other issues.
  • You will also need to provide proof of health insurance coverage if you become ill while working in Korea. If your employer does not offer this service, they should pay for it themselves!

South Korea has a range of visas for working abroad based on the length and type of work you will be doing.

South Korea has a range of visas for working abroad based on the length and type of work you will be doing.

E-1, E-2, E-3, and E-7 visas are for professionals, managers, and executives who have been invited to work in South Korea by an employer.

The Visa is valid for six months unless extended.

It would help if you were sponsored by your employer and provided evidence of your qualifications when applying for a Visa at an embassy or consulate of South Korea.

E-9 is available to foreign nationals seeking temporary employment as entertainers or athletes at professional sports events in South Korea (such as Olympic Games).

This Visa allows you to stay in the country until your contract ends or when another contract begins if necessary.

Still, it does not allow you access to any other area besides performing activities related to the said event(s).

Work Visa is categorized into E-1, E-2, E-3, E-7, and E-9 visas.

The first type of Visa is the E-1 and E-2 visas. These are for treaty traders and investors, meaning the applicant must be coming to Korea for business purposes only.

They cannot be working here or as a tourist.

The second category is the E-3 Visa.

This type of work visa allows professionals who are employed by a U.S.-based company in a speciality occupation (such as medicine) to enter Korea for up to three years at one time with no need for an additional extension beyond three years unless there’s been an extension request filed before during their stay overseas before coming back home again after spending time abroad again; but, if you were already granted an extension once before but now want another one then yes – it’s possible! 

To qualify for a work visa to South Korea, you must have a job offer before applying.

To qualify for a work visa to South Korea, you must have a job offer before applying.

This requirement can make getting one of these visas difficult if you don’t already have an employer lined up.

If you want to work in South Korea but don’t have a job offer yet, there are still ways around this issue.

You can try applying for another type of Visa—like an investor or student—and then once your application is approved by the Immigration Service of Korea (ISK), they will let you know when they receive word from employers with whom they’ve made arrangements regarding employment opportunities at their company locations abroad.

When applying for a work visa to Korea, you’ll need to show proof of enough funds to support yourself while living in the country.

When applying for a work visa to Korea, you’ll need to show proof of sufficient funds to support yourself while living in the country.

If you are not from South Korea, your employer must provide evidence that they have paid all taxes and social security contributions on your behalf.

This may include paying into an employee pension plan or health insurance policy.

The same goes if you are one of their employees—they will also need to prove they have paid taxes on their behalf by providing documents such as receipts or bank statements showing how much has been deducted from each paycheck since starting work.

Your company should also let go of any outstanding debts that could prevent them from sponsoring your visa application (such as unpaid bills).

If there’s any question about whether they can do this, it’s best left until after applying because it could affect whether other applications are approved too!

Once all your documents are gathered and sorted out, you’ll have to register all this information with immigration so they can check your eligibility.

Once all your documents are gathered and sorted out, you’ll have to register all this information with immigration so they can check your eligibility.

You will need:

  • A copy of your passport or another travel document (e.g., visa application form)
Processing time can vary depending on which embassy or consulate general handles your application.

Processing time can vary depending on which embassy or consulate general handles your application.

For example, if you apply at the Korean Immigration Service (KIS), it could take anywhere from 2 months to over 100 days for them to process your visa application.

The application process to get a work visa in South Korea depends on your visa type and country.

work visa in South KoreaThe application process to get a work visa in South Korea depends on your visa type and country.

In South Korea, there are three types of work visas:

  • J-1 Visa for visitors to study English or other language classes (long-term stay)
  • F-2 Visa for spouses of foreign nationals who want to join their partners and live with them; this is only open to women couples who have been married for less than two years.
  • F-4 Visa for families with young children under 18 years old who wish to stay together without working; this type of Visa is only available if both parents are citizens from countries that don’t recognize dual citizenship or do not allow same-sex marriage between spouses already living together (e.g., Japan).
The Last Word 

If you’re interested in working in South Korea, we hope this article has helped you learn more about the requirements and application process.

The work visa process can be complicated, but it’s not as difficult as it seems.

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